Saturday, 22 December 2012

Salted Caramel Pralines

It is a while since I made pralines, so I thought to do some to use up my leftover caramel from the banoffee cupcakes. I have a numerous chocolate moulds but I have to say I prefer the hard plastic ones over the silicone, but I gave it a go. You can use any filling you like this time I choose the new hit: salted caramel. At the first time I made this salted caramel chocolate the filling was too salty, so be careful not to overdone the saltiness. Also it was the quickest ever and would make a nice Christmas present for family. For a detailed guide how to temper milk or white chocolate(to have a nice, shiny cover) I used this website.

Salted Caramel Pralines



Ingredients 
150 g dark chocolate (I used 70,4% cocoa solid one from Callebaut)
1.5 g cocoa butter(1% of your total chocolate amount)
120 g caramel (I used Nestle Carnation)
pinch of sea salt


You will need a chocolate mould (either a silicone or hard plastic) a digital thermometer a paint brush and a pyrex bowl over simmering water in a pan. 



Place 2\3 of the chocolate in the pyrex bowl over simmering water in a pan. In order to get accurate reading from the digital thermometer watch out that the end of the probe should be in the chocolate mass but without touching the bottom of the bowl. So you checking the temperature of the chocolate and not the bowl. Keep stirring with a silicone spatula until it reaches 115 degrees Fahrenheit (46C).


When it reached the right temperature take off from the heat and immediately place the pyrex bowl in a bigger bowl filled with cold water. Add the remaining of the chocolate and stir gently to incorporate. When it is mixed add the cocoa butter and keep stirring until the mix temperature drops to 84 Fahrenheit (29C).

Return the chocolate above the warm mater and until the temperature reaches 88 Fahrenheit (31C), now the chocolate is ready to pour into the mould. The mould should be clean and dry, preferably cleaned with a muslin cloth.


I used the paint brush technique because I don't like wasting expensive chocolate. 
Basically there are two techniques when it comes to moulding: melt enough chocolate to fill all cavities to the top(double the amount of chocolate I described), leave it to create a shell around the mould and pour off the excess(therefore creating a lot of leftover chocolate/and unless you going to use it for something else it is too expensive just to use it for hot chocolate etc. In the chocolate factories it doesn't matter as they going to use it anyway, but at home....

So I used the paint brush technique: melt only the necessary amount and pour it to the mould. Using a simple brush start spreading the chocolate to the top of each mould cavity. Keep repeating the process until you think the shell around the mould is thick enough. 


This is the part where you have to experiment. The time required depends on your chocolate, your mould and the temperature in your kitchen. If you pour out the chocolate too soon the shell won't hold the filling and will break, but if you leave it for too long the chocolate shell will be too thick and the ratio of the filling to the chocolate will be unbalanced. I did both at the beginning, but it is all about learning. Now I generally have a feeling when it is right, usually it only needs 2-3 minutes.

When it is ready turn the mould up side down (place the chocolate bowl beneath it) and tap to the side of the bowl a couple of times. Scrape off the excess chocolate and place the mould into the fridge to harden.


In the meantime you can prepare the filling. This time it was easy: I took the ready caramel heated a little in the microwave and added a pinch of two sea salt. Don't be tempted to add more as the salty flavour will intensify with time. I did this mistake as well at the first time, I made a caramel sauce that was just deliciously salty...by the time I take it off from the mould it was more than pleasantly salty.


Pour the filling into a plastic piping bag and place it to the fridge to cool down.
When the chocolate is ready pour the caramel filling to 2/3 of the cavities, leaving enough space to close the chocolates. Put the mould back to the fridge.

When the caramel filling hardened the only job left is to close the chocolates. Somebody repeats the whole tempering process........well I just reheat the chocolate if needed to the right temperature(31C) and spread on top, scraping off the excess -nobody going to watch the bottom of the chocolate but if you quick enough you should manage the whole process with the tempered chocolate still at the right temperature so it will be shiny.




Hint and tips:
If you don't like salted caramel you have numerous other options>
My old favourite filling is the rum-soaked raisins and sweet chestnut puree. In Hungary we have a sweetened chestnut puree, what we defrost and pass it through a potato mash, eating with whipped cream on top (truly delicious)
Just add 100g sweet chestnut puree to about 80ml whipped double cream and rum soaked raisins................hmmmm.
Some of the other fillings I used to make: Amaretto soaked apricots with marzipan, chocolate cream with pistachio, lemon curd, peanut butter and raspberry jam. Below is a picture of my very first try featuring the flavours I mentioned above made by my plastic moulds:






Wednesday, 5 December 2012

Lemon and Raspberry Cupcakes

It was my 1 year' anniversary at my workplace and I made some cupcakes to celebrate this. I made some banoffee cupcakes and raspberry and lemon cupcakes from my new book from Peggy Porschen. I have to say I struggled to get 12 cupcakes from the amount she described so I increased the measurements slightly. I also found the icing ever so slightly sweet, so I added less icing sugar. BUT even with the sweet frosting it was more than delicious.

Lemon and Raspberry Cupcakes



 For the decoration
12 raspberries

For the frosting
120 g full-fat cream cheese
100 g unsalted butter, softened
220 g icing sugar, shifted
finely grated zest of 2 unwaxed lemons

For the sponge
120 g unsalted butter
120 g caster sugar
pinch of salt
finely grated zest of 2 unwaxed lemons
2 large eggs
120 g self-raising flour
2-3 raspberries per cupcake so 24-36 in total

For the sugar syrup
70 ml freshly squeezed lemon juice
70 g caster sugar

To make the frosting
Place the cream cheese in a mixing bowl  and beat until smooth and creamy. Place the butter and icing sugar and lemon zest in a separate bowl. Cream together until very pale and fluffy.
Add the cream cheese, a little at the time, to the butter mixture and mix at medium-high speed until the frosting is combined. Add the banana purée and chill until set.

To make the cupcakes
Place the butter, salt and lemon zest in a mixing bowl and cream together until pale and fluffy.
Beat the eggs lightly in another bowl and add slowly to the butter mixture while whisking quickly. If the mixture starts to separate or curdle, stop adding the egg and beat in  2-3 tablespoons of flour. This will rebind the butter.

Once all the egg has been incorporated into the butter mixture, shift in the remaining flour and stir until the batter is just combined. This will ensure the sponges stay light and fluffy. 

 Using a piping bag or a tablespoon, carefully place the batter into the cupcake cases until two-thirds full only. Drop 2 or 3 raspberries into each cupcake. Bake for 12-15 minutes, or until the inserted wooden skewer comes out clean.


To make the sugar syrup
While the cupcakes are baking, prepare the sugar syrup for soaking. Place the lemon juice and sugar into the saucepan and bring to the boil. Simmer until all the sugar dissolved then set aside to cool down slightly. 


Once the cupcakes are baked, let them rest for about 10 minutes outside the oven. Using a pastry brush, soak the tops of the cupcakes with sugar syrup while they are still warm: this allows the syrup to be absorbed faster. Leave to cool on a wire cooling rack.


Fill the chilled frosting in a plastic piping bag fitted with a large pain round nozzle and pipe a swirl of frosting on top of each cupcake.
To finish, place a raspberry on top of the frosting for each cupcake. 





Tuesday, 4 December 2012

Banoffee Cupcakes

It was my 1 year' anniversary at my workplace and I made some cupcakes to celebrate this. I made some banoffee cupcakes and raspberry and lemon cupcakes from my new book from Peggy Porschen. I have to say I struggled to get 12 cupcakes from the amount she described so I increased the measurements slightly. I also found the icing ever so slightly too sweet, so I added less icing sugar. BUT even with the sweet frosting it was more than delicious.

Banoffee Cupcakes


For the decoration
50g sugar florist paste(different colours)/marzipan
pink or white pearls
1 banana

For the frosting
120 g full-fat cream cheese
100 g unsalted butter, softened
220 g icing sugar, shifted
1 banana mashed 

For the sponge
120 g unsalted butter
120 g caster sugar
pinch of salt
seeds of 1 vanilla pod
2 large eggs
120 g self-raising flour
40 g plain chocolate (minimum 53% cocoa solids), chopped into small pieces

For the sugar syrup
70 ml water
70 g caster sugar
scraped vanilla pods

For the filling
100 g soft caramel 

Make the decoration at least a day ahead.
Kneed the sugarpaste or the marzipan with a small amount of paste food colour, if using, until smooth and pilable. Roll out the paste to a thickness off approximately 2mm.


Place the blossom cutter on the paste and press firmly. Lift off the cutter and release the blossom. Cut a few at a time. Lightly dust the blossom veiner with icing sugar and one by one place each blossom shape in the venier and press. Carefully bend the venier outwards to release the shaped blossoms and place in a well of palette or on a foam pad. Leave to set for at least a few hours or preferably overnight. 
Once dry, you can add shades of colour to your blossoms by brushing with a tiny amount of petal dust using a fine artist's bush. With a brush place a small amount of edible glue in the middle and place a pearl in the middle with a tweezer.


I also made some banana decoration. I sliced one banana then covered the surface with sugar. With a blowtorch caramelise the surface...and that is it:)

To make the frosting
Place the cream cheese in a mixing bowl  and beat until smooth and creamy. Place the butter and icing sugar in a separate bowl. Cream together until very pale and fluffy.
Add the cream cheese, a little at the time, to the butter mixture and mix at medium-high speed until the frosting is combined. Add the banana purée and chill until set.

To make the cupcakes
Place the butter, salt and vanilla seeds in a mixing bowl and cream together until pale and fluffy.
Beat the eggs lightly in another bowl and add slowly to the butter mixture while whisking quickly. If the mixture starts to separate or curdle, stop adding the egg and beat in  2-3 tablespoons of flour. This will rebind the butter.

Once all the egg has been incorporated into the butter mixture, shift in the remaining flour and stir until the batter is just combined. This will ensure the sponges stay light and fluffy. Fold the chopped chocolate through the batter using a rubber spatula.

 Using a piping bag or a tablespoon, carefully place the batter into the cupcake cases until two-thirds full only. Bake for 12-15 minutes, or until the inserted wooden skewer comes out clean.

To make the sugar syrup
While the cupcakes are baking, prepare the sugar syrup for soaking. Place the water, sugar and vanilla pod into the saucepan and bring to the boil. Simmer until all the sugar dissolved then set aside to cool down slightly. Discard the vanilla pod.

Once the cupcakes are baked, let them rest for about 10 minutes outside the oven. Using a pastry brush, soak the tops of the cupcakes with sugar syrup while they are still warm: this allows the syrup to be absorbed faster.

Leave the cupcakes to cool down completely then using a melon baller, scoop out the tops of each cupcake.

To add the filling, decorate
Using a fork, crush the ripe banana and then mix it together with the caramel cream. Place the banoffee mixture into a plastic piping bag and use to fill the scooped-out holes of the cupcakes.

Fill the chilled frosting in a plastic piping bag fitted with a large pain round nozzle and pipe a swirl of frosting on top of each cupcake.

To finish, place a sugar blossom or a slice of caramelised banana on the top of the frosting for each cupcake.






Friday, 30 November 2012

"Mum to be" Battenberg Cake

I made a cake for my colleague who had her leaving presentation this week, to start her new Yummy Mummy life. We didn't know the sex yet so I made a cake topping with generic colours, try to avoid the blue or pink. I made a battenberg cake as that is Ali's favourite, which was the first for me: also for baking and tasting. It turned out quite good, and the team demolished the cake in a short space of time. I used the battenberg recipe from the BBCgoodfood website.

"Mum to be" Battenberg Cake


Ingredients for the almond sponge
175 g very soft butter
175 g golden caster sugar
140 g self-raising flour
50 g ground almond
1/2 tsp baking powder
3 medium eggs
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp almond extract

Ingredients for the pink sponge
1 X ingredients for almond sponge
pink/red food colouring 

For the cake decoration
200 g apricot jam
500 g marzipan (I used golden marzipan)
little icing sugar, for dusting

250 g brown icing (for the teddy bear)
some different coloured icing ( I used Renshaw Funky Flavoured Sugargough, as you can have 4X100g in a pack at all different colours)
edible writing pan

You have to prepare the decoration at least two days ahead as the icing needs time to harden. I  just used a video on youtube- to find a tutorial: just type in: fondant bear. Actually is like playing with play dough. It isn't difficult, as you can see the bear, duck and the train is recognisable and actually this is my very first try with icing sculpting.
So I prepared the toppings two days in advance and just left in the living room to harden. 


Heat the oven to 180C and prepare a round baking pan. To make the almond sponge, put the butter, sugar, flour, ground almonds, baking powder, eggs, vanilla and almond extract in a large bowl. Beat with an electric whisk until the mix comes together smoothly. Scrape into the tin, spreading evenly and bake for 25-30 minutes-when you spoke with a skewer, it should come out clean. Cool the tin for 10 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to finish cooling while you make the second sponge.
For the pink sponge, prepare another round tin. Mix all the ingredients together as above but don't add the almond extract. Fold in some pink pink food colouring then scrape it all into the in and bake as before.

To assemble level the cakes(cut off the top if you have a little dome) and cut the sponges in half (all sponge layers should be the same height). Depending on the high of your sponge layers(sponge circles should be the same with and height) start cutting out sponge circles. For this cake I had 5 sponge circles. 


When you finished cutting one sponge layer lift out every second sponge circle, place it on top on the others and use it as the template. To make up the battenberg layers just use a pink, then a almond sponge till you made up the whole sponge layer. 

To assemble, heat the jam in a small pan until runny, then sieve. Brush the sponge layer with jam , than lay another layer on top but reversing the order of sponges.


When you finished with the cake, brush the surface with the remaining jam. Roll out the marzipan on a lightly dusted surface with icing sugar to just big enough to cover the cake. Carefully lift the marzipan and smooth over the cake. 
Place on top the decoration and serve:)



And this is the cake while cutting. I apologise as I don't have the best mobile to take a picture and in the office we don't really have proper knifes to slice a cake sharply.


Sunday, 25 November 2012

Mini Pineapple and Curd Cheese Cake

The second dessert I prepared for my dinner guests in my Lakeland straight sided mini cake pan is basically a tiny version of my full sized Hungarian summer fruit and curd cheese cake ,but with a twist. First of all I used a different chocolate sponge and I made the curd cheese layer sweeter to complement the pineapple topping. Also I have to mention it took about 2 times longer.........But the visual results worth it:) As I prepared with the Chocolate Swirl Banana Mousse at the same time, you will see both on the pictures. 

 Mini Pineapple and Curd Cheese Cake 


For the sponge
75 g self-raising flour
1.5 tbsp cocoa powder
85 g butter at room temperature
85 g golden caster sugar
1/2 tsp baking powder
2 eggs
1-2 tbsp milk

Curd Cheese layer
100 ml double cream 
20 g icing sugar
125g curd cheese *More on this at the Tricks and Recommendations
1\2 vanilla pod

Top layer
Fresh Pineapple-(you only need about 1/3 of a pineapple-cubed to small pieces)
1 Greens Quick Orange Jel or any other oragne cake cover jelly

acetate stips
40g chocolate for decoration-optional 


Heat the oven to 180 C and prepare a 23cm cake tin(you can use square one, doesn't matter as we will cut little rounds anyway).

Put all the cake ingredients in a  large bowl. Beat them together with an electric mixer until you have a creamy mixture. Add a little more milk if the mix is too stiff- it should fall easily from a spoon.

Pour the cake mix into the prepared tin and bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes or until the sponge springs back when pressed. Cool the cake than cut the sponge with a cake leveller to have a nice even layer base for the cake (it should be about 8 mm thick).



I used the little plastic holder of the tin bases to cut the circles and in the end, I managed 9 sponge rounds. More than what I needed, but some back up always handy in case of emergencies and it tastes nice with some jam.



Place the sponge circles into your form and put some acetate strips around the sides of the sponge. On one hand I needed some extra hight for my cakes, and on the other hand it will be easier to lift them out, and when I remove the strips I will have clear, neat layers without curd cheese marks everywhere.

To prepare the curd cheese layer whip the double cream to soft peaks then add the curd cheese, vanilla seeds and the icing sugar and mix it again. 



Divide the mixture between the 6 mould and press it down with your fingers. You have to create a perfectly flat and sealed curd cheese layer, because if you leave a tiny gap on the side your jelly will pour to the bottom and soften your sponge and ruin the cake.



With a kitchen towel clean the acetate strip that "may" have some curd cheese on. It is important in order to have a nice layer of clean jelly. Place on top your chopped pineapple, ideally it will be levelled as well so the jelly can cover the whole surface without pineapple pieces sticking out.


Prepare your cake cover jelly according to the instructions on the packaging- it is all different for each brand so I won't detail here.



When it is ready leave it to cool, stirring time to time. When it is about room temperature pour on top of the pineapple and place the cakes into the fridge to harden.

To prepare the chocolate decoration just melt the chocolate and with a piping bag create any shape on a non stick baking sheet. I put it into the freezer so it would set in time....and I forget them. After I prepared everything and paced them in front of the guest, my husband asked the whereabouts of the chocolate work.....Sometimes he is useful:)


Chocolate Swirl Banana Mousse

I had some guest to visit us today and I wanted to wow them. I made two type of mini, individual desserts: a Chocolate Swirl Banana Mousse and Mini Pineapple and curd Cheese one. I used my Lakeland cake pan, that looks like a muffin pan, but the sides are straight and the bottoms are removable. But you can use dessert rings as well. It isn't the lightest dessert, because of the banana, but it is really tasty.

 Chocolate Swirl Banana Mousse



Ingredients (makes 6)
6 Hob Nobs biscuits
25 g butter (melted)
250 ml double cream
2 ripe bananas
1 sachet of gelatine (9g)
1 tsp honey
1/2 vanilla pod

30 g chocolate for the swirl
30 g chocolate for decoration-optional


Crush the Hob nob biscuits (use the end of the rolling pin or a food processor) and mix with the melted butter. Divide the mix between the 6 dessert rings/ pan cavities and using your fingers press it to the bottom, to create a flat levelled surface. 
Place into the fridge so the base can harden.


In the meantime you can prepare the mousse. It isn't traditional mousse, as I didn't want to use raw eggs. 

Put the bananas into a food processor and blitz them to get a banana puree (with the processor the puree will be light and fluffy and gives volume, that you wouldn't get by just crushing them). 

Pour 100 ml double cream in a pan and start to heat. When it reaches boiling point add the sachet of gelatine and mix it well to avoid lumps, then leave it to cool slightly. In the meantime whip the rest of the double cream to soft peaks, then add the banana puree, honey, vanilla seeds and the cooled(not hot) gelatine+double cream and incorporate all ingredients well. 

Spoon on top of the biscuit base and level with a spoon.


Melt the chocolate and place 2-3 little coffee spoon's worth on top of each banana mousse. Using a toothpick create swirl, mixing the banana and the chocolate cream.



When finished place them into the fridge to set.
For the chocolate decoration just pipe the melted chocolate on a non stick baking sheet at any shape and place it to the fridge/freezer to set. After plating just insert carefully to top of each mini cake.

Saturday, 24 November 2012

Mini Cinnamon Doughnuts

The second thing I had to try from my Lakeland order was the mini doughnut mould. I fell in love with this mould and it was only a fiver. To be honest the size of the doughnuts are rather on the mini side(they are 4 cm diameter), but they tasted yummy. I used Peggy Porschen's recipe from my new book.

Mini Cinnamon Doughnuts


Ingredients
110 g plain flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
65 g caster sugar
25 g ligth brown sugar
1 medium egg
45 g whole milk
40 g buttermilk
1 vanilla pod
15g unsalted butter, melted

50 g melted chocolate-optional 

Preheat the oven to 160C. Prepare the mini doughnut mould by greasing each mould with spray oil.


Shift together the flour, baking powder, ground cinnamon and sugars in a mixing bowl. In a separate bowl whisk together the egg, milk, buttermilk vanilla seeds and melted butter.

Pour the liquid ingredients onto the dry ingredients, mixing briefly until just combined. Pipe or pour the mix into the prepared mould filling just above halfway.


Bake for 10-12 minutes or until the tops springs back to the touch and have lightly browned.

Melt the chocolate than dip each doughnut upside down into the melted chocolate until half coated(or alternatively just dip the warm doughnut into fine caster sugar to have sugared doughnuts). Leave it to set on a wire rack or sprinkle with cake decoration of your choice.







Chocolate and Amaretto Madeleines

I received my Lakeland offer yesterday and I had to used at least half of the new kit:) The first on the list was the mini madeleines silicone form. I used the first recipe I come across on the BBC Good food website. The original recipe calls for hazelnut liqueur (sadly I didn't have any at home) but I replaced with Amaretto (almond liqueur).

Chocolate and Amaretto Madeleines

Ingredients (makes 12 normal size or 30 mini ones)
80 g plain flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
20 g ground almonds
2 tbsp cocoa powder
75 g golden caster sugar
2 eggs
1 vanilla pod
2 tbsp Amaretto
90g unsalted butter, melted


Shift the flour, baking powder, ground almonds and cocoa with a pinch of salt. Butter the mini madeleines form.
Whisk the sugar and eggs with electric mixer until thick, pale and fluffy. Gently fold in the flour mix, vanilla seeds, Amaretto and butter. Cover the surface of the mix with cling film and chill for 30 minutes.

Heat the oven to 200C. Fill each cavity to 2/3 and bake it for 10 minutes or until risen and springy. Tap the form to loosen and tip out. Dust with cocoa and serve warm.



Saturday, 17 November 2012

Lemon, Almond and Poppy Seed Cake

 In the meantime of waiting for my new delivery from Lakeland:) I made myself useful:) I baked something that my husband loves the most: poppy seeded ....well anything that contains poppy seed. I used Peggy Porschen's new book I bought last week and the result was delicious.

Lemon, Almond and Poppy Seed Cake


For the sponge
200 g unsalted butter, softened
200 g caster sugar
4 medium eggs
200 g self-raising flour
100 g ground almond
30 g ground poppy seed (plus I put in 10g as a whole as well)
finely grated zest of 2 lemons

For the lemon syrup
100 ml -the juice of two lemons
100 g caster sugar


Preheat the oven to 175C and prepare the bundt cake tin.
For the sponge:Place the butter, sugar and lemon zest in a mixing bowl and cream until pale and fluffy.
Beat the eggs lightly in another bowl and slowly add the butter mixture while whisking quickly. If the mixture starts to separate or curdle, stop adding the egg and beat in 2-3 tablespoons of the flour. This will rebind the batter. Once all the egg has been added and combined with the butter mixture, shift in the flour and add the ground almonds and poppy seeds. Stir until the batter is just combined.

Pour the batter into the prepared cake tin, using a rubber spatula to help fill the tin. Before baking,  tap the filled cake tin on your work surface a few times to make sure the batter has reached all the cavities at the bottom of the tin.

Bake for 30-40 minutes, depending on your oven.The sponge is cooked when the sides are beginning to shrink away from the edges of the tin and the top is golden brown and springs back to the touch. 

While the sponge is baking, prepare a lemon syrup for soaking. Place the lemon juice and caster sugar into a saucepan and bring to the boil. Simmer until all the sugar crystals have dissolved. Set aside to cool down slightly.

Once the sponge is baked, immediately brush the sponge with half the lemon syrup: this allows the syrup to be absorbed faster.

Allow to cool for about 30 minutes outside of the oven. Once just warm, turn the cake out of the tin and leave to cool completely on a wire cooling rack. Brush the other side of the sponge with the remaining syrup.

Serve with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.


Monday, 12 November 2012

Terry's Chocolate Orange Cake

I offered to bake a cake to our BBC Children in Need Charity bake sale. I choose the cake I made for Halloween as it is sturdy, easy to slice, can be on the cake sale table for long and ok to transfer.......and it is delicious(the main thing). I also love chocolate and orange together, but I slightly altered the look of the cake so it would fit for sale. 
Recently I adapted a new look and prepared the cakes in my new 12 slices Zila Cake mould.
If you want to see the Zila range or buy some, you can do it here: Link to buy Zila Cake Mould


Terry's Chocolate Orange Cake




For the sponge
150 g self-raising flour
3 tbsp cocoa powder
175 g butter at room temperature
175 g golden caster sugar
1 tsp baking powder
3 eggs
1-3 tbsp milk
100 g 70% dark chocolate, melted and cooled

For the cream
300 g soft cheese
zest of 2 oranges
juice of 1.5 orange
3-5 tbsp icing sugar
200 ml double cream
1.5 tsp powdered gelatine
orange food colouring

For the decoration
1 Terry's Chocolate Orange
50 g dark chocolate
3 tbsp milk
1 tsp butter


Heat the oven to 180 C. Butter and base line your 23 cm round cake tin with baking parchment.

Put all the cake ingredients except the chocolate in a  large bowl. Beat them together with an electric mixer until you have a creamy mixture, then fold in the melted chocolate. Add a little more milk if the mix is too stiff- it should fall easily from a spoon.

Pour the cake mix into the prepared tin and bake in the oven for 20 -25 minutes or until the sponge springs back when pressed. Cool the cake than cut in three with a cake leveller.



For the filling, mix all ingredients in a big bowl except the double cream and the gelatine.
Heat the double cream in a heavy based pan to boil. Take off from the heat and add the powdered gelatine and mix well to dissolve any lumps. Cool down the mixture to room temperature  then add to the orange mixture. Work together the two mixture and add the food colouring(the amount you need depends on the brand, so use as recommended) and put to the fridge to harden a little.


When the cake is cooled and the orange mixture is solidish, spread one layer to the bottom sponge, sandwich on top the other sponge layer and spread another layer of cream on top.
For the chocolate icing, melt the chocolate with 3 tbsp of milk then add the butter. Spread on top of the cake, than pipe on the rest of the orange cream.
Finish off with the Terry's Chocolate Orange slices.
Enjoy:)

Ps: if you not familiar with the Terry's Chocolate Oragne, here it how it looks like: